Child custody is oftentimes the most contentious aspect of a divorce. Parents tend to struggle with the thought of going from spending every day with their child to only seeing them periodically. This is completely understandable, which is why those parents who are facing child custody issues need to be prepared to present legal arguments that support their position and the best interests of their child.

This can be difficult to do, especially when a child has been taught to say bad things about you by the other parent. This process of distancing your child from you is known as parental alienation. Parental alienation syndrome is controversial, but it can have a tremendous impact on your child and your relationship with your child. Your child’s perception of reality can become warped, and in the worst cases he or she may be made to believe that he or she has been abused when, in fact, that’s not the case.

Although your child’s negative statements and behaviors toward you may be used against you in a child custody proceeding, you might be able to argue parental alienation to your advantage. If you’re in this situation, then you might want to consider presenting evidence of the following:

  • That the constantly criticizes you
  • That there’s no evidence to support the criticisms or accusations made against you
  • That the child fully supports the parent who has initiated the alienation
  • The child doesn’t feel guilty about alienating behavior
  • The child doesn’t possess mixed feeling about you
  • The child claims that to hold these negative thoughts and feeling on all their own without any outside influence
  • Your child knows private details of your relationship with your spouse
  • The alienating parent prevents your contact with the child
  • Secrecy and gossip become normal
  • The strength of your bond with your child before the alienation began

These are just a few of the evidentiary tactics you might be able to utilize to your advantage if you feel like you’re the victim of parental alienation. Arguing parental alienation can be a tricky endeavor, though, so you should make sure that you have the help and support you need to make a compelling case.